Leadership

10 Things Worship Leaders want from Church Techs

While nothing replaces knowing the tech side of the audio craft, there’s a lot more to being successful in the role.


Gary Zandstra  ·  February 23, 2017

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Over the last 30-plus years, I’ve served on numerous tech teams at various ministries and have learned many things – many of them the hard way.

While nothing replaces knowing the tech side of the audio craft, there’s a lot more to being successful in the role.

Here are some things I’ve picked up along the way, combined with the results of an informal survey of worship leaders about what they want most from techs.

1. Pay attention. Attentiveness is the number one thing worship leaders value.

They want to know that someone cares and is looking out for them. When that’s not the case, it usually leads to animosity that manifests itself at rehearsal (worship leader yelling, “Hey, gang – down here. Yeah it’s me. I need more monitor!) and at services (frustrated look on worship leader’s face as he tries to discretely signal that he needs more monitor). It’s a recipe for disaster, resulting in frustration on both sides.
The solution is to stay consistently focused on what’s happening (of course) and to develop practices to make sure it happens. For example, learning to mix with your head up. Dave Rat, a top front of house engineer in the concert world, positions his console sideways in relation to the stage and even created his own console “Braille” system. This allows him to mix by touch, without continually looking down at the board, so that he can stay concentrated on the stage.

2. Positive attitude.

At one church I visited, all of the musicians were quite intimidated by the monitor engineer; in fact, he was so unpleasant that rather than interface with him, they were willing to live with horrible sound in their monitors, rehearsal after rehearsal, service after service. Don’t be this person!
It’s amazing how far good attitude goes. If the musicians know that you care about them and are working to make everything as good as possible, they’ll give you a lot of grace. And they’ll also be at their best from a performance standpoint.

3. It’s not all about you.

I’ve encountered several sound operators over the years who actually think the musicians wouldn’t be able to perform without them. Wrong. Someone else can and will step up. Being an accomplished tech is a wonderful thing, but the point is to be as useful as possible in supporting the efforts of everyone involved with worship. As top producer Quincy Jones famously said, “Check your ego at the door.” I call it “TnT” – Tech and Talent working together.

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ARTICLE TOPICS

Leadership · Development · Blogs & Opinion · Technical Team · Worship Leader · All Topics

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Gary Zandstra
Gary’s newest venture The Experience gives him the opportunity to help the local church using his vast experience in facilities and production.
Contact Gary Zandstra: gary@nemosyn.com ·  View More by Gary Zandstra


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COMMENTS

By jameslambertt on March 20, 2017

Attentiveness and ability to catch people’s attention are actually equally important features. I’d gladly buy essay to investigate topic raised here and contribute to already mentioned skills.